It’s only garbage-the high price we pay for trash

May 12th, 2009 | By | Category: Green Living

Have you ever wondered just where your trash ended up after you toss it into the garbage can? Has it ever occurred to you that the trash you discarded may have a monumental impact on the world in which we live? Have you ever considered that there might be something you could do to reduce the amount of garbage you produce in a day?

If you have, then you are among a growing mass of people who have begun to realize that our trash has consequences we all have to pay. And, you’re probably also in the growing number of people who are sighing, thinking there really isn’t anything you could do anyway.

But, you’re mistaken. Each of us can do a lot to preserve the natural world around us and improve not only nature, but our own health at the same time.

Yesterday, I started a post about this topic and intend to run a few in a series to help everyone learn the fun that can go along with becoming more responsible environmentally. It really isn’t as painful as protesting in undesirable weather and living within the trees for years to ensure they aren’t cut down. Many of the things we can do that preserve the environment are not only easy, but they are attractive as well.

I touched on some of the many crafts and reuses of items normally thrown away in the last post. I didn’t explain what happens to the trash once it leaves our trash can in the garbage truck, though. Today, the idea is to learn what happens once we throw something away and what the impact of that action has on us.

Little Johnny tosses a handful of school papers in the trash. He doesn’t think about where they came from or where they are going. He just knows you told him to clean out his backpack and that’s what he’s doing. He has to if he wants to go play baseball outside with his friends.

His sister, Suzy, dumps the junk mail into the garbage along with a soda can and few wads of plastic from the wrapping on her new CDs. She never stops to consider what will happen to it beyond the normal trip outside for the garbage man to pick it up at the end of the week. She only wants to listen to her new music.

Dad drops by the trash can with an assortment of shredded paper from documents and other goodies he’s left at his desk. He gets rid of the coffee cup with the plastic wrap from a trip to the gas station and deposits a candy wrapper-its contents long since gone.

Mom throws away the most. She rummages through the house for any trash that missed the observation of the others and even adds her own special touch to the garbage as she fixes dinner. Plastic and Styrofoam from packages of meat and cardboard from boxes of pasta heap themselves on top of the already bulging kitchen trash container.

No one considers the consequences. The trash this family has accumulated has grown. It will be set out to the curb for pickup, be compressed, and be tossed into a landfill to sit until it degrades. It is in the degrading that the problem of trash is first seen. Not all things biodegrade at the same rate.

Food and natural matter in raw forms that are similar to food biodegrade rather quickly and without a lot of fuss. Insects come along and take care of most of that variety of waste, leaving little behind. But food is not really a huge concern when discussing trash. It will decay as will any living thing and return to the earth from which it came.

Cardboard and paper are sometimes a concern. Besides the fact that many trees were removed from the land to produce the paper products, there is the fact that these items are slightly slower to biodegrade. Instead, they become homes and nesting materials for rodents and insects alike, creating a high pest population.

Plastic, rubber, and a variety of other such materials are a major hazard. These items will sit in the same landfill for what should be considered forever as they have biodegradable life spans of 3-5 hundred years. They will keep the landfills full and cause the need for the development of new landfills indefinitely.

You might think that conventional recycling is the best answer. However, for some items, recycling it can cause as much or more air pollution and damage as filling up the dumps with it. It is for this reason that we should all consider new and innovative methods of reusing the very things that will come back to haunt us in our own backyards.

Trees and plants are opposite when it comes to respiration. They intake carbon dioxide and give oxygen as a by-product. Humans intake oxygen and give carbon dioxide as a by-product as do many members of the animal kingdom. If we were to take a few of our plastic castoffs and turn them into attractive planters for our homes, not only would each of us reduce the amount of plastic in landfills but we would also breathe easier.

Ann had some wonderful ideas on how to use some castoff food parts for fertilization. Her idea on the egg shells used in potted plants and in gardens is not only friendly to the garbage pile but also friendly to us-especially if the plant we are using them with happens to be a tomato.

There is a horned tomato worm that can consume in a single meal an entire tomato plant. However, egg shells prevent this worm from his favorite food source-our tomato plants.

Her tip shows what can happen if we all think of just one or two things that would better the environment. Only a few seconds of our day would really change but the benefits we would reap could be huge.

Coffee grounds make great scouring aids when cleaning burnt on food from pans and they help a garbage disposal stay free of smells that we don’t find pleasant.

Newsprint works well to clean windows and mirrors with a solution of vinegar and water.

Craft paper for the kids can be made using paper that has been allowed to soak into pulp in water and dried using a screen for molding. Once dry, it offers a variety of colors and textures that make new creations shine.

And, all of this takes but a few seconds of time yet reaps a much more pleasant earth for us to live in. Tomorrow, I’ll list some tips and tricks for items outside the house-like motor oil, old tools, license plates, and more. In the meantime, give it a try with a few going green tips and let us know what your tips are. We’d love to hear them!

Tags: , , , , , ,
Loading...