Cleaning up the Air

After spending some time in the hospital for health problems related to breathing, I decided the first thing I should write about upon returning home this morning is dust and irritants in the air. For those of us living with COPD, Asthma, Emphysema, and Bronchitis, this is a major cause of distress. Yet, to date, the complete elimination of dust from the face of the earth is not possible.

That said, it is also important to remember that dust is not the only trigger for difficulties in breathing, It is simply one that can be easily controlled within our homes. It can’t be eliminated from all environments that might be encountered, but in our homes it is.

While I was sick, my family did the chore that created the problem: they dusted. I had always used the old cloth and can of furniture polish. My family, though, thought this was too much work. Instead, they used the Swiffer dusting system. From their results, I will be adopting this method.

The disposable dusters have an advantage over the old fashioned method in that less dust is plummeted through the air with every swipe. The heads for the duster already contain the optimal amount of polish and are treated to eliminate a larger amount of allergens. They are also safe to use on all surfaces, even computers. This is a big plus since I live my life on a keyboard.

The disadvantages of using Swiffer are, of course, the cost and the creation of additional trash for landfills, but the cost is outweighed when compared to medical bills due to the complications dust can create.

Swiffer is not the only system that uses replaceable dusting heads. Many companies now offer the same technology for the common household chore of dusting because we have become a society of convenience. No longer are feathers the preferred or even the most sanitary method of dusting quickly.

The feather duster, which is more modern than a cloth and polish, does little to control the dust in a home. In fact, these types of dusters tend to spread the dust. This is because they only remove the dust from the desired area and disperse it into the air, where it eventually settles on carpets and upholstery. Later, some of the dust left behind is vacuumed or swept up with a broom. If the vacuum does not use a hepa or hepa type filter, the remaining particles are scattered once again. With a broom, a larger amount of particles are scattered. This creates one large cycle of constant dust in the home.

The addition of an air filtration system to the home can help with the elimination of dust and other air pollutants. as well. In fact, after having researched the IQAir air purification system for the home during an earlier blog and taking into consideration my health care provider’s advice, I will be adding an IQAir purifier to my home to ensure better health.

My family will also benefit, although no other member of my family has breathing difficulties. I have learned that the lungs can be damaged easily. In addition, lung tissue cannot regenerate itself once damaged. The simple adjustments we are making as a family will help ensure that common pollutants in a home do not contribute to the damage of lung tissue in all members of the household. And, I believe that anything we can do to better the health of those we love is a worthwhile investment.

If you or your loved ones suffer from respiratory illnesses, whether chronic or acute, please spend some time investigating the options for cleaner air in your home. You can find a multitude of products available at very reasonable prices at EZ Vacuum.

Asthma Directly Related to Air Quality

Asthma is a disease or disorder in the lungs that causes sufferers to experience difficulty in breathing. The condition can be mild to severe, occasional or chronic. Asthma has been the culprit of missed days of school, work, and even some deaths.

Asthma has also increased in occurrence in the past few years as pollution rises and air quality flounders. For many years, the rate at which asthma has increased was suspected to be related to the air quality in both indoor and outdoor air. However, no conclusive proof could be found for lack of controlled testing.

That changed recently when a study this month took on the challenge of proving the importance of air quality in relation to air function. Thirty seven children were moved from urban to rural environments. All of the children had asthma in a mild but persistent form. Upon the move, it was noticed that there was an almost immediate reduction in the inflammatory cells in the nose and that a significant reduction of nitric oxide levels also occurred. This is important as the exhalation of nitric oxide is thought to reflect the degree of inflammation in the airways and lungs.

To see if the air quality had a direct impact, air was tested in both the former urban environments and in the new rural environments. Pollen counts and air pollution were measured meteorologically to ensure accurate readings for the study.

Relocation to the less polluted rural environments also brought with it an improvement of airway function. This was indicated and measured by the amount of air the children could expel after the move compared to the amount of air they could expel in the urban environments. The findings suggest a marked improvement when allergens and irritants are controlled in the air.

While the study worked with outside air, it also gives credence to air quality’s relationship with asthma. If windows are opened, then air from the outside can and does enter the home. Vents and other airway passages commonly found in homes can also be sources of irritants. Given these simple facts, it is advisable for families to invest in air purification systems that enhance the quality of air breathed in an effort to reduce allergies, asthma attacks, and ultimately medical bills.

You can get a quality air purification made by IQAir, a leader in the industry of air purification at EZVacuum. The investment could save you and your family from irritants that directly affect your health and the health of your family.

Source:

http://www.foxnews.com